Adirondack Chiropractic - 518-583-3232

Newsletter Articles
March 2017

  • Seizures Stopped Under Chiropractic Care
  • Sense of Smell Returns with Chiropractic Care
  • Gait, Balance and Coordination Improved with Chiropractic
  • World Health Organization Lists Twelve Highest Priority Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
  • Reduction of Blood Pressure in a Patient Receiving Chiropractic Care
  • Pain with No Medical Cause Helped by Chiropractic
Seizures Stopped Under Chiropractic Care

Seizures Stopped Under Chiropractic Care

The Journal of Upper Cervical Chiropractic Research published a case study on February 23, 2017, documenting chiropractic bringing about the resolution of seizures of a woman suffering from epilepsy. The authors of the study define epilepsy by saying, "Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes seizures in the absence of any underlying medical condition such as fever."

Epilepsy is fairly common. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimated that in 2013, 1.8% of the population, equaling 4.3 million adults over 18 years of age, suffered with this affliction. The CDC also estimated that 1% of those under the age of 18 also have epilepsy. This means that a total of 5.1 million people in the U.S. alone suffer with this problem at a cost of $15.5 billion in healthcare costs each year.

In this case, a 22-year-old woman went to the chiropractor seeking help for her health issues. At that time, she was suffering from daily headaches and was getting a seizure about every third day. Her seizures would last from several minutes to up to an hour. Her medical care for these problems consisted of medications which were largely ineffective.

A chiropractic examination was performed which included a postural analysis, range of motion, orthopedic and neurological tests, thermographic studies, and x-rays. Findings of the test and x-rays were indicative of the presence of subluxation in the woman's upper neck.

The patient completed a "Quality of Life in Epilepsy patient survey" (QOLIE-89) prior to beginning care to be used as a baseline, and to evaluate changes as care was rendered. On this initial test, the woman's score was 29.27 indicating a very low quality of life. An average score for epileptic patients is 67.90 for this test.

As soon as chiropractic care was started, the patient reported that she stopped having headaches and no longer had any seizures. This improvement was noted after the very first visit and the patient remained headache-free and seizure-free throughout the course of her care. A follow up QOLIE-89 survey was performed and the woman's score had increased to 80.715, an improvement in her score of 51.445 points, which is 12.275 points higher than the average.

This case was not an isolated one as the authors also reviewed several previous studies of chiropractic care for people with epilepsy. What they noticed was that, of the 17 cases documented in studies, 14 of those patients who were taking medication for their seizures did not see any benefit. However, when these patients received chiropractic care, 15 of the 17 reported positive outcomes.

In their conclusion the authors wrote, "This case adds to a body of evidence of patient-reported improvements in seizure activity following a course of subluxation based chiropractic care."

Sense of Smell Returns with Chiropractic Care

Sense of Smell Returns with Chiropractic Care

On February 27, 2017, the Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research published a case study documenting a patient suffering a loss of the sense of smell (Anosmia), which was corrected with chiropractic care. According to the Anosmia Foundation, between 2 and 5 million American adults suffer from some form of this condition.

The study reports that a loss of smell can be either partial or complete, and can be temporary or permanent. A complete loss of smell is rarer. The condition is more common in the elderly population. Some of the associated causes can include head trauma, sinus or nasal diseases, pathologies, toxic exposures such as cocaine abuse, and some very rare congenital anomalies. Several medical conditions have also been associated with a loss of the sense of smell. These include: Alzheimer's disease, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and depression.

In this case, a 58-year-old woman came to the chiropractor for care related to her high blood pressure as well as symptoms from a recent car accident a month earlier. Her blood pressure condition had been present for 20 years since the birth of her son, and she was taking medication since that time. Since her car accident, she had been suffering with right shoulder and mid-back pain.

The woman reported that she had been involved in another car accident 9 years prior. It was immediately after this accident that she had lost her sense of smell. Her ability to smell had not returned since that time.

A chiropractic examination was performed which included palpation, a posture assessment, paraspinal surface EMG, and x-rays. Based on the findings, specific forms of chiropractic care were initiated.

The results of the care were objectively documented by improvements in the paraspinal surface EMG, the spinal x-rays and the other examination procedures that were performed.

Over the course of care, the woman reported that the pain from her most recent accident was dramatically reduced. Additionally, she noted that her sense of smell had completely returned.

The study authors noted that there is no standard medical care for anosmia. Many times, this condition is overlooked because of the concern of more severe injuries in post-traumatic accidents. A common medical treatment for this condition is the use of oral steroids. However, published studies on this type of treatment has shown that the use of steroids is just as effective as spontaneous recovery, but carries significant risk of side effects.

Because of the lack of successful medical treatment, and the increased risk due to steroid usage, the authors believe that additional studies into chiropractic for people with a loss of their sense of smell is warranted.

Gait, Balance and Coordination Improved with Chiropractic

Gait, Balance and Coordination Improved with Chiropractic

A long-term case study published on February 9, 2017, in the Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research followed the improvement received from chiropractic care of an elderly man with a long list of health issues including difficulty in walking, balance, standing and overall mobility. Mobility, musculoskelital pain, and balance are of key concern to the geriatric population and have a significant impact on the quality of life.

Pain plays a key role in the abilities of a senior to function normally. According to a 2014 study in the Journal of Physical Therapy Science. "Spinal pain is the most common of all chronic pain disorders. In a previous study, 24.6% of older adults with chronic pain reported back pain."

In this case, an 85-year-old man presented himself to the chiropractor for a variety of health concerns. His chief complaints for which he went to the chiropractor were difficulty walking and poor posture. In addition to the issues he sought chiropractic for, he also had a number of prior medical diagnoses that included benign prostatic hypertrophy, osteoporosis, heart valve insufficiency, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, angina, and other assorted problems. Most of his issues were being treated medically. As a result, the man had been prescribed eighteen different medications that were being taken on a daily basis.

A chiropractic examination was performed. This included a range of motion study, paraspinal thermography, a postural analysis, spinal motion palpation and spinal x-rays. As expected, the man's range of motion in all areas was significantly reduced. His head was carried in a forward position causing a roundness of his shoulders. The spinal x-rays on this patient showed considerable calcium buildup indicative of intervertebral degenerative joint disease, spinal arthritis, and old compression fractures of several of his vertebrae.

Based on the findings of all the examination procedures, the diagnosis for this man was healed compression fractures, calcification of the abdominal aortic, atherosclerosis, abnormal postural and vertebral subluxations in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar regions of the spine. With this diagnosis, chiropractic care was rendered.

This study recorded the chiropractic care and progress for this man over an eight year period. Over that time, a variety of chiropractic techniques were utilized. The study records that, over time, the man's overall health improved and he experienced improvement in gait, balance stability, coordination, posture and reported an increase in strength in the lower extremities. The man's medical doctor also noticed the changes and commented that the patient was healthier while under chiropractic care. In addition, he was able to get himself in and out of a chair, and was able to reduce the amount of prescription and over the counter medication he was taking.

The author of this study summed up the implications of this study by noting, "Age related musculoskeletal problems can cause impairment in a patient's balance and gait. An unstable person on their feet puts them at a higher risk of falling and as age increases so does the risk of falling." She continued to explain how this can help by saying, "Individuals over the age of 65 years of age that suffer from musculoskeletal dysfunctions may benefit from chiropractic care. Chiropractic care focuses on the vertebral subluxation complex (VSC)."

World Health Organization Lists Twelve Highest Priority Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

World Health Organization Lists Twelve Highest Priority Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

The World Health Organization (WHO) issued a list of twelve "Priority Pathogens" that pose a great health risk to mankind. The WHO is asking that researchers focus on development of new antibiotics to fight these bacteria.

In a February 27, 2017, release titled, "WHO publishes list of bacteria for which new antibiotics are urgently needed", the WHO points out that this list represents a growing concern about the ineffectiveness of antibiotic usage against bacteria that have been evolving and adapting quickly.

Dr Marie-Paule Kieny, WHO's Assistant Director-General for Health Systems and Innovation stated, "Antibiotic resistance is growing, and we are fast running out of treatment options. If we leave it to market forces alone, the new antibiotics we most urgently need are not going to be developed in time." In an interview, Dr. Kieny continued, "This list is not meant to scare people about new superbugs. It's intended to signal research and development priorities to address urgent public health threat."

Just two days earlier, the Washington Post ran an article titled, "Dangerous antibiotic-resistant infections on the rise for children in the U.S., study finds." This new study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society highlighted how big the problem of antibiotic resistance has become. This study found that 3 out of 5 children admitted to hospitals already had an antibiotic-resistant infection.

Dr. Sharon Meropol, the studyís lead author and an assistant professor of pediatrics, epidemiology and biostatistics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine commented, "Antibiotic resistance increasingly threatens our ability to treat our children's infections."

Part of the concern is the over usage of antibiotics not only in human illness, but also in agriculture. Animals are given antibiotics in many cases just as a prevention. The issue is that the bacteria in them become resistant and then find their way to human populations.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, (CDC) for every 1000 people in the US who see a doctor, 842 are given antibiotics. Dr. Theoklis Zaoutis, professor of pediatrics at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia states that, "About 30 percent of antibiotic use is either inappropriate or unnecessary in the U.S."

The CDC highlights this growing issue on their website. "Antibiotic resistance is one of the world's most pressing public health problems. Illnesses that were once easily treatable with antibiotics* are becoming more difficult to cure and more expensive to treat. Infections from common antibiotic-resistant food borne bacteria, such as Salmonella, can cause more severe health outcomes than infections with bacteria that are not resistant to antibiotics."

The WHO ended their release on this issue with a stern warning that speaks to an overall re-thinking of how we use antibiotics. "While more R&D is vital, alone, it cannot solve the problem. To address resistance, there must also be better prevention of infections and appropriate use of existing antibiotics in humans and animals, as well as rational use of any new antibiotics that are developed in future."

Reduction of Blood Pressure in a Patient Receiving Chiropractic Care

Reduction of Blood Pressure in a Patient Receiving Chiropractic Care

The Annals of Vertebral Subluxation Research published a case study with a review of pertinent literature on March 6, 2017, documenting the positive effect chiropractic has on people with hypertension. The study defines hypertension as a systolic blood pressure of greater than 140 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure greater than 90 mm Hg.

Treatment of hypertension is one of the most expensive components of medical care in the U.S., costing a total of $50 billion in the year 2009. Upwards of 78 million Americans are being treated for hypertension. According to the study, it is estimated that by the year 2030, the cost as a result of hypertension and related illness will reach $343 billion per year. It is estimated that 30.5% of men and 28.5% of women are hypertensive.

Hypertension itself is not the major concern. Of more concern are the health issues that come from long term hypertension which can be serious or even deadly. In reporting data on years of life lost due to related condition from hypertension, the study states, "...related diseases in 2010 was estimated at: 7.2 million as a result of ischemic heart disease, 1.9 million as a result of stroke, and 2.2 million as a result of the combination of chronic kidney disease, other cardiovascular and circulatory diseases, and hypertensive heart disease."

In this case, a 50-year-old man went to the chiropractor with no health complaint other than hypertension. He had been diagnosed with hypertension 24 years prior. His only other history concern was resolved back and neck pain 5 years earlier. He was previously taking a hypertensive medication which he self-discontinued due to his observation that it was not working. He had previously been under chiropractic care and was seeking care on this occasion for wellness purposes.

A chiropractic and general examination was performed on the man. At the time of the examination, his blood pressure measured 155/100 mm Hg. Additional findings of the examination showed a restricted cervical range of motion. Thermography and spinal palpation also showed spinal areas of concern that led to the diagnosis of multiple subluxation in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine.

The man began receiving chiropractic adjustments at the rate of one per week. Blood pressure was measured before and after the chiropractic adjustments to record any changes. Palpation and thermography were also performed regularly to access progress of care.

The study reports that there was an average 8.39 mm Hg drop in systolic and 3.56 mm Hg drop in diastolic blood pressure measured pre- and post-adjustment over the course of the chiropractic care.

The study authors reported on the literature available on the subject of blood pressure related to chiropractic and related care. They found that there were 40 articles in the current literature under the umbrella of chiropractic adjustments, spinal manipulative therapy, and osteopathic manipulationís effects on blood pressure. They point out that the variety of research on chiropractic and blood pressure makes it difficult to make specific statements related to the type of chiropractic care best suited to affect blood pressure. However, they were able to conclude that "Results from these studies are largely varied as well with studies suggesting the chiropractic as effective in managing hypertension as the use of a two-drug combination therapy."

Pain with No Medical Cause Helped by Chiropractic

Pain with No Medical Cause Helped by Chiropractic

The Journal of Pediatric, Maternal & Family Health published a case study on March 9, 2017, describing a patient who was having severe pain with no medical reason being found. The patient was referred to a psychiatrist but instead went to a chiropractor where she found relief.

The study begins by pointing out that throughout the history of chiropractic, many patients who found help under chiropractic were prior medical failures. The authors stated, "In more than a century of the chiropractic profession, anecdotes and testimonials are replete with describing the success of chiropractic care in patients with a history of non-responsiveness to medical care."

In many cases where no medical reason for pain can be found, the patient is often sent for psychiatric evaluation and told they have conditions such as conversion disorder or hysteria, or simply told that their problem is "all in your head." The patient in this case study fits this category.

In this case, a 16-year-old girl went to the chiropractor with her parents consent. Two days earlier, she had suffered an injury while throwing a discus. She reported that she heard and felt a "rip" upon release of the discus. She immediately felt a severe stabbing burning pain across her shoulders and lower neck. She rated the pain as a 10 out of 10 using a scale of 0 to 10 with 10 being the worst pain. Within 40 minutes, she reported that her left arm went numb and weak.

No chiropractic care was rendered at the time of her first visit and the girl went to an orthopedic specialist for further evaluation. She remained in a hospital for 8 days during which time an orthopedic evaluation was performed. This included an MRI which showed no findings. Because the the orthopedic tests did not find a reason for her pain, and because she had a past history of depression, the girl was discharged from the hospital and referred to a psychiatrist for evaluation. After 11 additional days, she returned to the chiropractor and chiropractic care was started.

Following her first chiropractic adjustment, the girl reported a 50% increased muscle strength within 1 hour of her visit. By her 4th visit, she reported that she had regained normal use of her left arm. However, she continued to experience neck pain and stiffness. By the sixth visit, her pain was gone and her full range of motion had returned.

Approximately 5 months later, the girl reported another injury after being hit on the head with a basketball. From this injury, she started to experience some of her initial symptoms, but not as severe. After one adjustment, the girl reported a complete recovery from her symptoms.

In their conclusion, the authors summed up this case by saying, "This case report described the successful chiropractic care of a teenager with vertebral subluxations and signs and symptoms not congruent with objective outcome measures. Such patients may benefit from chiropractic care despite the lack of positive medical testing to inform medical care."